Antidote To March Madness

 

“Always be able to kill your students.” – Masaaki Hatsumi (Bujinkan Ninjutsu)

Did he really say that?  – TheMartialArtsReporter

“A good martial artist does not become tense but ready, not thinking but yet not dreaming. Ready for whatever may come.” Bruce Lee

“Champions aren’t made in gyms. Champions are made from something they have deep inside them – a desire, a dream, a vision. They have to have the skill, and the will. But the will must be stronger than the skill.” Muhammad Ali

“Courage is being afraid, but then doing what you have to do anyway.” Rudy Giuliani

“The one who has conquered himself is a far greater hero than he who has defeated a thousand times a thousand men.” The Dhammapada

“Success is going from failure to failure without loss of enthusiasm.” Winston Churchill

“Success is never final. Failure is never fatal. It is courage that counts.” – Winston Churchill

“Never interrupt your enemy when he is making a mistake.” Napoleon Bonaparte

“The more you sweat in training, the less you bleed in combat.” Navy SEALs

“Those who are skilled in combat do not become angered, those who are skilled at winning do not become afraid. Thus the wise win before the fight, while the ignorant fight to win.” O Sensei Ueshiba

“The measure of a man is not in how he gets knocked to the mat, it is in how he gets up.” Unknown, but could have been me. Really.

“Strength does not come from physical capacity. It comes from an indomitable will.” -Mahatma Gandhi

“You carry on no matter what the obstacles. You simply refuse to give up … and, when the going gets tough, you get tougher. And you win.” Vince Lombardi

“If you’ll not settle for anything less than your best, you’ll be amazed at what you can accomplish in your lives.” Vince Lombardi

“No one can defeat us unless we first defeat ourselves.” Dwight Eisenhower
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Why Kick High If You Can Kick Low?

I know that well executed high kicks can get people’s attention and admiration. When competing in certain styles such as Tae Kwon Do, Karate etc.  that’s how you get the points, right?! I also know they have their justification, so just hear me out.

Speaking from my personal experience, it’s very exhilarating to execute a yodan-kizami-zuki (upper jab), a chudan-gyaku-zuki (cross to solar plexus) and then finalize with a yodan-mawashi-geri (upper roundhouse kick) to an opponent’s temple. Hmm, was just strolling down memory lane.  Yeah, baby (was supposed to sound like Austin Powers!).

Now, many years later, for me the first two techniques no problem. The final mawashi geri to the what? Let’s get real, will ya? I am not 20 anymore, so I will simply adapt to circumstances which means I am going apply a Muay Thai round kick to my not so friendly opponent’s upper thigh by using my shin.

Listen up, even without going to the gym or dojo for years and years most people can acquire the skills for this kick fairly quickly. I also believe it’s a pretty neat self-defense technique for women. We all know that legs are more powerful than arms. So let’s just put that knowledge to work in our favor.

This combination and especially the final technique is really fast and really effective. Really!

To give you a better idea of what it looks like, check out this clip and try it. You’re gonna like it.

Celebrating The Life Of Brandon Lee, Who Would Have Turned 45 Today

Happy Saturday, everybody!

Where did the week go? I dunno.

I have been thinking about posting something about Bruce Lee’s son, Brandon Lee.

Now, get this: I was planning on posting about him today, February 1, and during my research I find out that today would have been his birthday.

This cannot be a coincidence!

Brandon Lee would have turned 49 today. And here again somebody who left us on this planet way too prematurely.

He was a very aspiring movie star and according to acclaimed movie critic, Roger Ebert, after watching Brandon Lee’s performance  in “The Crow“, Brandon Lee clearly demonstrated that he might have become an action star, had he lived.

I totally agree with Roger Ebert.

You might remember that Brandon Lee was accidently shot and killed on March 31, 1993 at the age of only 28 while filming “The Crow“.

This is really sad, also because he was scheduled to get married to his fiancee, Eliza Hutton, on April 17.

Brandon Lee definitely had the looks for the Big Screen, but he was more than just another pretty face. After acquiring acting skills at the world-famous Lee Strasberg  Academy and being part of a theater group, he was able to put it all together with his martial arts expertise that he was taught by Guro Dan Inosanto.

Before starring in The Crow, which became a box-office hit after his untimely death, Brandon Lee actually performed in a number of productions such as Kung Fu: The Movie, Kung Fu: The Next Generation, Legacy of Rage, Showdown in Little Tokyo, and a movie that I really enjoyed at the time it was released in 1992, Rapid Fire.

I know that a lot of people have focused on the final fight scene  or showdown, but I really like the initial fight scene, because you get a pretty good idea of how Brandon Lee applies a lot of the JKD principles his father defined and how he uses any type of tool, weapon or whatever he can get his hands on to save his character, Jake Lo.

Besides the impressive fighting skills he put on display in the 5 min. clip  below, I also admire his philosophic perspective he so thoughtfully selected for his wedding invitations:

“Because we don’t know when we will die, we get to think of life as an inexhaustible well. And yet everything happens only a certain number of times, and a very small number really. How many more times will you remember a certain afternoon of your childhood, an afternoon that is so deeply a part of your being that you can’t even conceive of your life without it? Perhaps four, or five times more? Perhaps not even that. How many more times will you watch the full moon rise? Perhaps twenty. And yet it all seems limitless…”

Celebrating The Life of Brandon Bruce Lee, February 1, 1965 – March 31, 1993